Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Recipe: Garlic-Herb Crusted Rack of Lamb

Just recently a Guest® of ours asked me: "Do you really cook all the things you post on your website?"  I laughed and asked him if he thought I had some sort of personal Chef.   Yes!  Of course I do!  And most of the recipes I include here are created in my kitchen during the week.  They may involve a few ingredients but they're typically not difficult. Weekends can get more elaborate,  but it's nice to have good meals during the week too. 
 
This recipe is one such example.  Elegant, delicious and simple.   It was chilly and raining last night so I decided to use the oven and crust a few lamb racks. 
 
 
Garlic-Herb Crusted Racks of Lamb
 
Two lamb racks, fat cap removed
4 large eggs beaten
4 cloves garlic, minced small
1 large handful Italian parsley, chopped
Seasoned Bread Crumbs  (see below)
Salt & Pepper
 
Beat the eggs into a bowl large enough to dredge the lamb in.  Spread the bread crumbs on a large plate.  I used a 50/50 mix of garlic-herb flavored Progresso bread crumbs and plain Panko crumbs.  To the bread crumbs I added a sprinkle of Pecorino cheese, the diced garlic, and the parsley.  Mix well.  Dry the meat and season with salt and pepper. 
 
Start a tablespoon of olive oil in a heavy bottomed pan that is oven safe.  Dip the lamb racks into the egg, then into the bread crumb mixture, then back into the egg, and then back into the bread crumbs.  Repeat with the other rack.  Sear the racks one at a time until the crust browns.  The meat will still be raw.  

~ Searing Lamb:  Note the coating, and how little oil there is in the pan ~

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Once the second rack is browned,  arrange them in the pan and pop them into the oven. They will need about 15-20 minutes to reach medium rare. Remove them when they hit 135 degrees on a meat thermometer and let them rest for 10 minutes.  They'll reach 145 by that time, the perfect rare. 
 
While the meat is finishing in the oven, you can easily make a rustic side of mushrooms, onions, and peas.  I used some truffle butter, some shittake, and some crimini mushrooms for this version.


~ Mushroom Ragu:  The earthiness works well with the robust flavor of the Lamb ~

Finally, after 20 minutes....


~ Pretty Much Perfect! ~

Salute!

3 comments:

  1. John, love lamb, and this style certainly appeals to me!
    Wine pairing?
    Maybe Australian Shiraz, a Brunello, or a Russian River Zinfandel? Of course we believe whatever one likes, but...

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  2. Dennis,

    I think any of those would work, including a Bordeaux or Rhone. I opened a Sonoma Cab that was corked, and then rushed to grab a Napa Cab.

    It was Australian lamb though - one of my big Aussie Shirazes would have been better I think...

    I find the Aussie lamb to be a bit gamey compared to US lamb.
    J

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    Replies
    1. John, I never thought to compare Aussie vs. Am., but something I'd like to "taste" test.
      My standard beef fare is almost always Aussie grass-fed beef, which is definitely gamey!

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